This post is a quick recap of work I've been discussing on Twitter in the last few hours. I've just finished putting together a version of mitmproxy that takes advantage of CVE-2014-1266, Apple's critical SSL/TLS bug. We knew in theory that the issue should give access to all SSL traffic using Apple's broken implementation - I can now report that this is also true in practice.

I've confirmed full transparent interception of HTTPS traffic on both IOS (prior to 7.0.6) and OSX Mavericks. Nearly all encrypted traffic, including usernames, passwords, and even Apple app updates can be captured. This includes:

  • App store and software update traffic
  • iCloud data, including KeyChain enrollment and updates
  • Data from the Calendar and Reminders
  • Find My Mac updates
  • Traffic for applications that use certificate pinning, like Twitter

It's difficult to over-state the seriousness of this issue. With a tool like mitmproxy in the right position, an attacker can intercept, view and modify nearly all sensitive traffic. This extends to the software update mechanism itself, which uses HTTPS for deployment.

At the time of writing, Apple still doesn't have a fix deployed for OSX. It took less than a day to get the patched version of mitmproxy and its supporting libraries up and running. I won't be releasing my patches until well after Apple's pending update, but it's safe to assume that this is now being exploited in the wild. Of course, intelligence agencies have no doubt been on top of this for some time - perhaps some of the inflammatory Sochi security horror stories were plausible after all.